USA | NYC
 


Day 1498

Still walkin’

February 5th, 2016

I'm still walking and still regularly posting photos — I'm just working through a big backlog right now. See below for the latest posts. (The dates on the posts are the dates I took the pictures.) The progress map linked at right is up to date, by the way, even though the photos aren't.

Day 1199




You ask where I live
Here's the address I give
The four winds and the seven seas


I didn't see any signs indicating this, but the playground that contains the Seven Seas Sports Courts is apparently called Four Winds Playground. Henry Stern's fingerprints are all over this place, from the unusual names (that are likely a reference to an old song — wouldn't be the first time) to the animal art above the entrance.

I don't know why Mr. Stern would have picked these names for this place in particular; perhaps they're just a general nod to the international character of Queens.

Day 1199

Dual Corvettes

April 12th, 2015



A September 2014 Street View image shows three other sports cars (including another Corvette) parked at the house across the street.

Day 1199

St. Ann Church

April 12th, 2015



You can see a few interior photos here.

Day 1199

Could be worded better

April 12th, 2015



You can see the whole poster here.

Day 1199


Day 1198

9/11 memorial #245

April 11th, 2015


Day 1198

The Recovery Room

April 11th, 2015



After throwing back a few in the Emergency Room, be sure to stop by the Recovery Room, located just over three blocks from New York Hospital Queens.

Day 1198

Phony parking lot trees

April 11th, 2015



Note the built-in electrical outlet.

Day 1198




We've seen lower.

Day 1198

Cottonwood in bloom

April 11th, 2015





This is a male cottonwood. It's the females that produce the seeds with the fluffy white sails that give the trees their name.

Day 1198

Evergreen Community Garden

April 11th, 2015



In recent years, there's apparently been a lot of strife at this huge community garden (aerial view) in Kissena Corridor Park. According to a 2013 Wall Street Journal article:

Despite its serene setting and rows of flowers and vegetables, a community garden in Flushing, Queens, has turned into a battlefield.

Violent fights, death threats and shouting matches, sometimes involving fistfuls of dirt, have become routine at Evergreen Community Garden, leading to volunteer guards at the entrance and police patrols. And almost all of the tangles involve elderly Korean gardeners, officials and witnesses say.

The disputes grew out of the city Parks & Recreation Department's decision last year to take control of the 5-acre garden from a Korean-American senior citizens' group, which had transformed the trash-filled public space into a working garden back in the early 1980s.

The parks department—which contends the seniors' group had been improperly selling produce from the city-owned plot and excluding outsiders—turned control of the park over to its GreenThumb network of community gardens and installed a manager last year.

But the older gardeners are still trying to reclaim the land, at times by drastic means.

A year ago, the garden's 75-year-old former manager clutched a lighter and container of gasoline, threatening to light himself on fire if he didn't get his old job back, city officials said. The incident prompted a police hostage negotiation team to respond and two nearby schools to be locked down.
You can read the rest of the story here (text-only version here).

Day 1198

A railroad ran through it

April 11th, 2015



According to a nearby plaque set amid some pavers designed to resemble railroad ties, the short-lived Flushing-to-Creedmoor section of A.T. Stewart's Central Railroad of Long Island passed by this spot on its way through what is now Kissena Park. As we've seen, portions of the railroad's route east and west of Kissena Park have been incorporated into Kissena Corridor Park.

Day 1198

Dorothy McCarthy

April 11th, 2015



This little monument and the ones from the previous two photos (Korean War and 9/11) are all located in the same part of Kissena Park. As I was walking through the area, I saw three young girls wandering around and inspecting everything. They were discussing whether the Korean War memorial or the 9/11 one was more important. The size of the Korean War memorial makes a seemingly indisputable case for it being the more important of the two, but, then again, I would imagine that if I were a young New Yorker, even if I had not yet been born when the twin towers came crashing down, any mention of 9/11 would probably seem far more powerful than even the most imposing monument to some long-ago war I'd never heard of.

When the girls reached Ms. McCarthy's memorial, the youngest one asked what it was. The oldest took a minute to examine it and then announced: "Dorothy McCarthy. She played tennis and was loved."

Day 1198

9/11 memorial #244

April 11th, 2015