Day 264

Lousy drainage

September 19th, 2012



Standing water and the various chemicals contained therein have eaten away the asphalt at the end of this Hunters Point driveway and exposed the old Belgian blocks lying beneath.

Day 264

Infrastructure galore

September 19th, 2012



The elevated roadway running across the photo is the Long Island Expressway. The little platform in front of it is the lightly used Hunterspoint Avenue LIRR station. The tunnel in the foreground is one of four that carry LIRR, Amtrak, and NJ Transit trains beneath the East River between Manhattan and the Harold Interlocking (one of the nation's busiest railway junctions) here in Queens. And visible off in the distance, as it often is these days, is One World Trade Center.

Day 264

Hunterspoint Avenue LIRR station

September 19th, 2012



and its lovely green patchwork canopy

Day 264

A once-familiar companion

September 19th, 2012



It's been a while since we last crossed paths with the Citicorp Building, New York's tallest building outside of Manhattan

Day 264

Reaching up

September 19th, 2012



The seemingly tenuous grasp of an old-timey fire alarm call box

Day 264

Portal of the day

September 19th, 2012


Day 264

The natural enemy

September 19th, 2012



of the Roadinator

Day 264

Wall of morning glories

September 19th, 2012


Day 264

A busy sign on a busy road

September 19th, 2012



The Boulevard of Death

Day 264

Winged Fist Way

September 19th, 2012



This street renaming honors the Irish American Athletic Club (a.k.a. the Winged Fists), whose members (and former members) brought home more than 50 Olympic medals for the US between 1900 and 1924. The IAAC's ranks, as you might suspect, largely comprised Irish-American athletes (including many of the voracious Irish Whales), but the club was open to men of all ethnicities; John Taylor, the first black Olympic gold medalist, was a member, as were a few Jewish track and field champions.

The IAAC disbanded when the US entered World War I, but their stadium, Celtic Park, stood here in Sunnyside until 1930, when it was demolished to make way for the apartment complex where this sign is now displayed. (This isn't the actual street sign; it's a ceremonial version that was presented to the local historian whose efforts led to the renaming.)

Day 264

Celtic Avenue

September 19th, 2012



This diagonal block-long street, whose name is a nod to the Irish heritage of many Sunnysiders, is a remnant of a early road that once ran all the way to Bowery Bay.

Day 264

Porthole of the graves

September 19th, 2012



This pedestrian bridge fencing has been modified to provide photographers with an unobstructed view of Old Calvary Cemetery and the Midtown skyline.

Day 264

Double-decked

September 19th, 2012



The Long Island Expressway briefly takes on a second tier east of its interchange with the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. The upper roadway is for through traffic; the lower is for traffic moving between the two expressways. This is what things look like during the PM rush hour.

Day 264

Just curious…

September 19th, 2012



What exactly is that winged woman carrying in her hands?

Day 264

Sunnyside Gardens Park

September 19th, 2012



Like Gramercy Park, Sunnyside Gardens Park is privately owned and open only to nearby residents willing to cough up an annual fee. Its membership roll is currently maxed out, with dozens of families biding their time on the waiting list.

Day 264

The Sunnyside Arch

September 19th, 2012



Erected in 1983, it was refurbished a few years ago and given a new lighting scheme; it was partially lit the last time we passed by.

Day 264

Sunset, Sunnyside

September 19th, 2012