USA | NYC
 


Day 881

Calvary Cemetery chapel

May 29th, 2014



The September 1909 issue of Popular Mechanics called this the "most remarkable mortuary chapel in America". (Flip back one page in the magazine and you'll see two photos captioned "Largest Horse Ever Cast in Bronze—Its Interior Used as a Banquet Hall".)

Day 881

Stephen Brodie

May 29th, 2014



Steve Brodie became famous in 1886 as the first person to survive a jump off the Brooklyn Bridge, but it's far from clear that he ever actually jumped. Many believed he had someone throw a dummy off the bridge while he swam out toward the spot where it landed, surfacing near a boat that pulled him out of the water. Whether or not he really did the deed, he took full advantage of the celebrity that came his way as a result, opening a successful bar that traded on his reputation and starring in a play that climaxed with him leaping off the bridge to save a girl's life. And his name lived on long after he did. In 1949, almost half a century after his passing, he was the subject of a Bugs Bunny cartoon. Watch it here!

(Curiously, an 1886 NY Times account of his supposed feat described him, without any further elaboration, as a "long-distance pedestrian".)

UPDATE: As the Fensk pointed out, his wife's name was, quite appropriately, Bridget!

Day 881

Tess Gardella

May 29th, 2014



A white (blackfaced) Aunt Jemima, though not that Aunt Jemima

Day 881

Mosaic headstone

May 29th, 2014



Antonio Tabacchi

Day 881

Al Smith

May 29th, 2014



The Happy Warrior with the blue moustache

Day 881

Michael Walsh

May 29th, 2014



Mr. Walsh, a.k.a. Mickey Welch, was the third Major League pitcher to win 300 games, the first pinch hitter in Major League history (he struck out), and one of two baseball Hall of Famers buried here in Calvary (the other is Wee Willie Keeler).

Day 881

Alsop family cemetery

May 29th, 2014



This tiny family burial ground, with its first interment dating back to 1691, has been swallowed up, and is entirely surrounded, by Calvary Cemetery (aerial view), making it a little enclave of Protestantism in a vast Catholic necropolis. This brings to mind the old Betts family burial ground, now encompassed by the Jewish Mt. Zion Cemetery.

Day 881

Calvary Park

May 29th, 2014



A city park fully contained within a private cemetery — weird! From the Parks Department's website:

On April 28, 1863, the City of New York purchased the land for this park from the Trustees of St. Patrick's Cathedral and granted Parks jurisdiction over it. The land transaction charter stated that Parks would use the land as a burial ground for soldiers who fought for the Union during the Civil War (1861-65) and died in New York hospitals. Parks is responsible for the maintenance of the Civil War monument, the statuary, and the surrounding vegetation. Twenty-one Roman Catholic Civil War Union soldiers are buried here. The last burial took place in 1909.
I had never been to this part of the cemetery before, but the four statues at the base of the monument (individual photos about halfway down this page) looked very familiar. It turns out that they're identical (albeit with some missing pieces) to the figures on the Soldiers’ Monument at Green-Wood Cemetery (photos: 1, 2, 3, 4), as well as other Civil War monuments around the country.

Day 881

Always In Our Hearts

May 29th, 2014



Catherine Messina, 1928-1953, Beloved Sister

Veronica A. Byrne, 1943-2009, Beloved Wife, Mom, Sister & Nana

Day 881

Old Calvary

May 29th, 2014



This is the original section of Calvary Cemetery, with the Kosciuszko Bridge visible in the background. Calvary is home to a truly staggering number of dead folks: somewhere between 1,750,000 and 3,000,000.

Day 881

Dry ice to the left

May 29th, 2014



Compressed gases to the right

Day 881



Day 881

Giuseppe Petrosino

May 29th, 2014



From a previous post:

Joe Petrosino was the city's first Italian-American police detective. Standing a feisty (and chunky) 5-foot-3, he was a prominent leader in the fight against Italian-American organized crime around the turn of the 20th century. This role eventually cost him his life when he was assassinated in 1909 while on a mission in Sicily, making him the only NYC police officer killed in the line of duty outside the US. While his name has largely been forgotten in the years since, he was beloved by the New Yorkers of his time: an estimated 200,000 people turned out to watch his funeral procession (photo) make its way through the streets of Manhattan and Queens!
Lieutenant Petrosino is buried here in the newer sections of Calvary Cemetery.

Day 881


Day 873




I was going to say that this establishment's presidential name didn't fare as well as that of Obama Fried Chicken in Brooklyn, but then I checked Street View.