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Day 968

Purple Martin houses

August 24th, 2014



From the Purple Martin Conservation Association's website:

Today, east of the Rockies, Purple Martins are the only bird species totally dependent on humans for supplying them with nesting sites. And they have been managed by man longer than any other North American species. If humans were to stop supplying martins with homes, they would likely disappear as a breeding bird in eastern North America.
In 2003, the NY Times reported that this seasonal purple martin colony here in Annadale and another a bit further south down the Staten Island shore were the only two in the city.

Day 968

Gazing down the shoreline

August 24th, 2014



of Raritan Bay

Day 968

Awesome mailbox #94

August 24th, 2014


Day 968

An A-frame and then some

August 24th, 2014



You can see this unusual house a little better in the winter.

Day 968

Buster’s Crossing

August 24th, 2014


Day 968

Now More Than Ever

August 24th, 2014


Day 968


Day 946

Portal of the day

August 2nd, 2014


Day 946




Cell antennas? What cell antennas?

Day 946

Flourishing curbside garden

August 2nd, 2014


Day 946

Eighteen

August 2nd, 2014


Day 946

Eltingville Transit Center

August 2nd, 2014



In 2010, the NY Times ran a little day-in-the-life account of the goings-on at this park-and-ride bus hub:

At 12:36 p.m., one of the pay phones inside the center rang.

"Hello," said the man on the other end, sounding as if he was trying to keep calm. "Someone called me from this number like 10 times?"

He had reached a bus station on Staten Island, he was told.

"O.K.," he said, and hung up.

Nine minutes later he called back, wanting to know who had been calling him earlier.

"Because someone’s harassing me now, and this is in the middle of a police investigation," he said. "Where is this place?"

The Eltingville Transit Center.

"O.K.," he said, and hung up again.

Day 946

NO CARTS

August 2nd, 2014



Protecting a baby fig tree

Day 946

Backyard pears

August 2nd, 2014


Day 946

Sweet Brook Bluebelt

August 2nd, 2014



What's a Bluebelt?

The Staten Island Bluebelt is an award winning, ecologically sound and cost-effective stormwater management for approximately one third of Staten Island’s land area. The program preserves natural drainage corridors, called Bluebelts, including streams, ponds, and other wetland areas. Preservation of these wetland systems allows them to perform their functions of conveying, storing, and filtering stormwater. In addition, the Bluebelts provide important community open spaces and diverse wildlife habitats. The Bluebelt program saves tens of millions of dollars in infrastructure costs when compared to providing conventional storm sewers for the same land area. This program demonstrates how wetland preservation can be economically prudent and environmentally responsible.