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Day 1045

Simple yet sturdy

November 9th, 2014



A Siamese connection rump repeller

Day 1045

FYRQUEL

November 9th, 2014



Sitting outside the old Blue Ridge Farms factory

Day 1045

The ruins of a salad empire

November 9th, 2014



Blue Ridge Farms, whose former processing plant occupies this entire block in Cypress Hills, was once the East Coast's largest producer of prepared salads, and by the 1990s was Brooklyn's third-largest manufacturer (behind Pfizer, which closed its Brooklyn plant in 2008, and Cascade Laundry, which went out of business in 2010). The company had been run by the Siegel family ever since its founding in the mid-20th century, but in 2004, facing some financial difficulties, the Siegels agreed to take on Thomas Kontogiannis as a major investor, which led to a series of shady dealings with him that eventually resulted in his family taking control of the company and selling off all its assets, including its name. (Kontogiannis is currently serving time in federal prison, having been sentenced twice in recent years: in 2008 for laundering bribes for former Representative Randy "Duke" Cunningham, and in 2011 for orchestrating an enormous $98 million mortgage fraud.)

After the demise of Blue Ridge Farms, the company's production complex here in Cypress Hills was left vacant, and was the site of a huge seven-alarm fire in 2012. The burned-out factory is still standing today, a massive, forlorn monument to the downfall of a once-thriving business.

Day 1045

Barberz: Honorable mention

November 9th, 2014



The z-in-lieu-of-an-s has to be in the barbershop's name to officially count.

Day 1045




Built 1924-26. Until he got kicked out in sixth grade, Tony Danza was a student at the parish's school across the street, supposedly hitching a ride to class each day on the back of his dad's garbage truck.

Day 1045

Welcome

November 9th, 2014



to the Historic Community of CYPRESS HILLS

Day 1045

40 Euclid Avenue

November 9th, 2014


Day 1045

Big columns, little house

November 9th, 2014



Rick Gomes of the East New York Project believes that this house at 107 Pine Street was built between 1886 and 1893, but that its columns were added at a later date, sometime before 1918, possibly by a carpenter who purchased the house in 1904. He also notes that there's a similarly unimposing house with almost identical columns tacked onto it located just over half a mile from here at 81 Essex Street.

Just across the street from 107 Pine is the old social/worship hall of Blessed Sacrament Parish, built in 1911-12. I wonder if the construction of its impressive columns had any influence on the aforementioned carpenter, or if his columns were already standing then.

In the background at right, you can see a J train on the Jamaica Line.

Day 1045

Campus Place

November 9th, 2014



This block-long street and its neighbor to the north, Adler Place (originally called Adelphi Place), were built on the former site of Adelphi Oval, which existed from about 1907 to 1916 as the athletic field of the Adelphi Academy and Adelphi College.

Day 1045




This oddball artwork can be found on the wall (or, rather, is part of the wall) of Brooklyn's PS 7. Here's a look at the left side of it.

Day 1045

GOLDMAN

November 9th, 2014


Day 1045

An endless line of mausoleums

November 9th, 2014



at Salem Fields Cemetery

Day 1045

Modern styling

November 9th, 2014



Check out the beautiful stained glass inside.

Day 1045

The tombs of Salem Fields

November 9th, 2014



Among New York City's many grand cemeteries, Salem Fields is not particularly well known. But its western section is positively lousy with mausoleums — jam-packed to a degree I've never seen before.

At left, the tomb of Benjamin Altman, founder of the B. Altman & Co. department store and the charitable Altman Foundation, is reportedly a simplified version of the Alexander Sarcophagus (not to be confused with the tomb of Alexander the Great, despite what the previously linked article says).

Day 1045

Robert Marshall

November 9th, 2014



Bob Marshall was a dedicated wilderness advocate whom we first learned about back in Montana, where a sign hanging outside his namesake preserve tells of his famous answer to the question of how much wilderness America really needs: "How many Brahms symphonies do we need?"