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Day 905

Rolls under wraps

June 22nd, 2014


Day 905

990 Castleton Avenue

June 22nd, 2014


Day 905

AMERICA

June 22nd, 2014


Day 905

1473 Richmond Terrace

June 22nd, 2014



According to the Staten Island Advance, Quinlan has been in business for some 125 years, and its building is even older, dating back to the early 1800s.

Day 905


Day 904

Walker Park

June 21st, 2014



Since 1885, this park has been home to the Staten Island Cricket Club, the nation's oldest continuously active cricket club, which was founded as the Staten Island Cricket and Baseball Club in 1872. It was at the club's original home in St. George that, according to many, modern tennis was introduced to the US in 1874 by Mary Ewing Outerbridge (sister of the Outerbridge Crossing's eponym), who had seen the sport being played while on vacation in Bermuda.

Day 904

Looking back

June 21st, 2014



along the old North Shore branch of the Staten Island Railway toward where I was standing when I took this shot

Day 904

Geese on the kill

June 21st, 2014



Bayonne's sewage-pumping wind turbine is visible across the Kill van Kull in New Jersey.

Day 904

Washed-out remnants

June 21st, 2014



of the old North Shore branch of the Staten Island Railway

Day 904




This structure is quite reminiscent of the Staten Island Criminal Courthouse we saw on Targee Street; it turns out they were designed by the same architects. And as was the case with the criminal courthouse, it was surprising to come across this imposing government building in a quiet outlying neighborhood.

Day 904

Staten Island Zoo

June 21st, 2014



Of the city's five zoos and one aquarium, this is the only one that's independently operated (i.e., not run by the Wildlife Conservation Society). It once had the world's most complete collection of rattlesnakes, and it's currently home to Staten Island Chuck (a.k.a. Charles G. Hogg), New York's weather-prognosticating groundhog guru, who supposedly has a much better track record than his more celebrated Pennsylvanian counterpart, Punxsutawney Phil. The role of Chuck has been played by different groundhogs over the years, and two of them have been involved in notorious Groundhog Day incidents in recent memory. One bit Mayor Bloomberg during the festivities in 2009, and the most recent Chuck — a female, actually — died a week after wriggling out of the arms of 6-foot-6 Mayor de Blasio and tumbling to the ground, although it's unclear if the fall contributed to her death.

Day 904

Mets burial shroud

June 21st, 2014


Day 904

Neeeeeeigh!

June 21st, 2014



Outside the Gardiner-Tyler House

Day 904

Gardiner-Tyler House

June 21st, 2014



Built around 1837, this former country manor was once the home of Julia Gardiner Tyler, President John Tyler's widow and "one of New York's most conspicuous rebel sympathizers". Her mother had purchased the place in 1852, and Mrs. Tyler crossed Civil War battle lines to move here from Virginia after her husband's death in 1862. In 1878, the house was acquired (though not necessarily ever lived in) by William M. Evarts, the US secretary of state, who had previously served as US attorney general and would go on to become a US senator, and it was also occupied for a time by the Russian consul general, who "lived there in great style".

Speaking of John Tyler, he was the first person to become president without being elected to the position. Dubbed "His Accidency" by his foes, he ascended from the vice presidency in 1841 when William Henry Harrison kicked the bucket a mere month after being sworn in. His first wife died in 1842 and he married Miss Gardiner in 1844, making him the first president to be widowed, and the first to get hitched, while in office. As the father of 15 children with his two wives, he was the most genetically prolific of all our presidents (as far as we know, anyway; politicians/slaveholders have occasionally been known to sleep around). And thanks to old widowers marrying much younger women, two of his grandchildren, remarkably, are still alive! (Or at least they were as of last fall.)

Day 904

Kreuzer-Pelton House

June 21st, 2014



This original part of this house, at far left, was built in 1722 as a one-room cottage. The subsequent additions date to about 1770 and 1836.