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Day 924




Rarely used by passenger trains, this is the single-track connection between the two main legs of the Hammels Wye (what's a wye?) that carry the two branches of the Rockaway Line onto the peninsula. This connection was, however, notably put into passenger service after Hurricane Sandy as part of the route of the H train, a temporary shuttle that provided free rail service along the peninsula while the tracks across Jamaica Bay that connect the Rockaways to the rest of the subway system were being reconstructed.

Day 924




Founded by Holocaust survivors, Madelaine was the largest employer in the Rockaways before Hurricane Sandy hit, employing 400 or more people in the peak seasons before Christmas and Easter. It's reopened since the storm, but it's operating on a smaller scale with just a fraction of its former work force, and it's considering moving out of the city if it can't secure the funds to fully restore its production facilities.

Day 924

Queen Anne in the morning

July 11th, 2014


Day 924

Rockaway flora

July 11th, 2014


Day 924



Day 924

Next door to the cats

July 11th, 2014



stand three Sandy-damaged bungalows still in disrepair.

Day 924

Spectators

July 11th, 2014


Day 924


Day 923

JUICE

July 10th, 2014



at Veggie Island

Day 923

Women Veterans Monument

July 10th, 2014



This 1989 statue was the city's first monument to honor the women who've served in the US military during wartime. It was commissioned by a local American Legion post, which planned to install it in Rockaway's Veterans Memorial Plaza, next to the World War I doughboy memorial (cast in 1927; reportedly the peninsula's oldest sculpture).

However, the city's Art Commission (now called the Design Commission) rejected the statue as ''not strong enough artistically", preventing it from being permanently placed on city property. So the Legionnaires made a stopgap arrangement with the Parks Department to temporarily install the monument across the street from the doughboy (placements of a year or less were not subject to Art Commission approval) while they searched for a permanent location.

But the statue, now known to some as "the doughgirl", still stands across from the doughboy today. It seems that its popularity with the community has led the city to overlook the fact that it's not really supposed to be here — at least that was the case as of 2003. (This brings to mind the story of the Fred Lebow statue in Central Park, which is briefly relocated each year to maintain its status as technically temporary.)

Day 923

“The Science Of Hair”

July 10th, 2014


Day 923

Lady Sings the Blues

July 10th, 2014



This tribute to Billie Holiday was the first of the post-Sandy Beautify Earth murals painted in the Rockaways. You can see others here.

Day 923

The asterisk house

July 10th, 2014


Day 923

Fiery skies

July 10th, 2014



at the Rockaway Beach Surf Club

Day 923

Boats in the trees

July 10th, 2014



(There's a marina next door.)

After taking this photo, I continued to the end of Beach 84th Street, which terminates at what appeared to me to be a house standing beside Jamaica Bay. It wasn't until later, when I was looking at a bird's-eye view of the area, that I realized that what I had seen was not a single house by the bay, but rather the end of a row of about 16 bungalows built on a pier that runs out into the water. These unusual houses, apparently more than a century old, were in the news back in 2008 when the state passed a law allowing the city to sell the pier to the homeowners who lived atop it. A few years later, the artist Duke Riley featured the bungalows in one of the stained-glass pieces he designed for the nearby Beach 98th Street subway station.