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Day 1252

A unique headstone(s)

June 4th, 2015



in Washington Cemetery

Day 1252

690 Ocean Parkway

June 4th, 2015



Three items of note from a search for this address in the newspaper archives:

1) 1941: A photo shows Zalman Asher Dunn, a resident of the building and a "tennis star of the Brooklyn College of Pharmacy" (a real athletic powerhouse, I'm sure), providing a woman with "some first-hand information on how to grip a tennis racket".

2) 1945: Vilma Sperling, a 16-year-old professional dancer who lived in the building with her mother, ran off to marry a "wealthy" 36-year-old taxi driver (his mother owned a fleet of cabs). A few hours after their wedding, however, the police arrested the couple at their hotel. Vilma was charged with being a wayward minor, while her husband was charged with abduction and marrying a minor. At his hearing, Vilma testified that she was "terribly" in love with her husband — "who deposited $2,500 in a bank for her and gave her a ring and a fur coat" — and that her mother had demanded a payment of $5,000 if they wanted her consent for the marriage. The charges against the couple were eventually dropped, and while Vilma's mother sought to have the union annulled, Vilma's husband was looking toward the future, telling the press: "No more show business for [Vilma]. She's going to be a real little wife and we'll have lots of kiddies."

3) 1956: George J. Wald, a 34-year-old high school art teacher from the building who had been married twice before, was charged with abduction and rape after eloping with a 17-year-old former student. The girl's parents had him arrested, but her father later relented and asked for the charges to be withdrawn after the couple agreed not to see each other until she turned 18. The district attorney said he would still "submit the matter to the grand jury, but he also indicated that he did not want to stand in the way of 'true love.' "

Day 1252

Red, white, and blue

June 4th, 2015


Day 1252

1305 Albemarle Road

June 4th, 2015





(The lower photo above is from a visit to the neighborhood in 2012 when there were fewer leaves on the trees.)

Here's the architectural historian Christopher Gray's take on this structure:

The most unusual of these dwellings [on Albemarle Road in Prospect Park South] is the one built in 1905 for George E. Gale at 1305 Albemarle, at the northeast corner of Argyle Road, in white clapboard with a colossal two-story Ionic portico. Designed by an architect known only as H. B. Moore, the Gale house has a striking assortment of windows, among them roof dormers with a kind of webbed sash, topped by ebullient broken pediments. On the second floor, there are spider-web-type windows with Gothic-style sashes, and on the rear are leaded glass windows.

Mr. Moore ran copper cresting in the form of anthemion leaves around the top of a bay window on the side of the house, and he put low, curved eyebrow dormers on either side of the third-floor gable. The Gale house is worth a special trip.
UPDATE (July 30, 2016): This house was recently sold for $2.98 million. You can see photos of the expansive interior here.

Day 1252

1440 Albemarle Road

June 4th, 2015





Designed in 1905, this huge Colonial Revival concoction has been covered in asphalt siding for decades. The cast-iron street sign standing at the corner of the lot dates back to the original development of Prospect Park South.

UPDATE: The actress Michelle Williams has purchased this house (interior photos) and intends to fix it up. The Historic Districts Council says of her architect's plans: "The very reasonable and sensitive interventions proposed here, coupled with the removal of the unfortunate asphalt siding, moves this house in the right direction. HDC would like to commend and thank the applicant for this thoughtful proposal."

Day 1252

131 Buckingham Road

June 4th, 2015





This Japanese-style residence, built in 1902-03, is the "most exotic and certainly the best-known house in Prospect Park South", according to the neighborhood's 1979 historic district designation report. It was designed by John J. Petit, who employed three Japanese artisans to imbue the place with a "genuine oriental quality". You can see more photos of the house here, including many shots of the interior details, which a 1903 ad described as "a faithful reflection of the dainty Japanese art from which America is learning so much."

Day 1252

104 Buckingham Road

June 4th, 2015



This house, designed in 1901 by Carroll H. Pratt — the architect, not the laugh track pioneer — is one of the many stately dwellings lining the streets of Prospect Park South. The neighborhood originated as a turn-of-the-20th-century suburban community whose developer, Dean Alvord, sought to "illustrate how much of rural beauty can be incorporated within the rectangular limits of the conventional city block." Alvord had the area's numbered streets renamed to sound more aristocratic — East 11th through 16th Streets became Stratford, Westminster, Argyle, Rugby, Marlborough, and Buckingham Roads, respectively — and he required potential buyers to provide references "so as to protect the families of lot purchasers against undesirable social and moral influences."

Day 1252

Portal of the day

June 4th, 2015


Day 1252


Day 1251

NO SITTING ON THIS STOOP

June 3rd, 2015



AT NO TIME!

(Photographed on an unofficial stroll through Crown Heights.)

Day 1245

Twin fishermen

May 28th, 2015



This bench sits outside St. Clement of Ohrid, the first (and, as far as I can tell, still the only) Macedonian Orthodox Church in the five boroughs.

Day 1245

Churchagogue of the day

May 28th, 2015



New York Dong Won Presbyterian Church, formerly the synagogue of Congregation Agudas Achim

Day 1245

Portal of the day

May 28th, 2015


Day 1245

More College Point roses

May 28th, 2015


Day 1245

Vette Works

May 28th, 2015







This place is true to its name. I saw eight Corvettes in the shop.

Hey, looks like I've taken a photo here before!